Microsoft Ignite Conference: Day 4 Round-Up

Last day of the MS Ignite conference for me. Let’s take it to the bridge:
Bridge

Another metaphor? You betcha:

– Cloud vs on-premise
– Microsoft as Service Provider vs Shrink Wrapper
– Unified experiences vs Diversified devices
– People-driven Intranets vs Intranet-driven people
– Windows OS as a true personal & biz life and productivity platform vs Windows OS as a 900 pound gorilla

My top picks for Day 4 in the SharePoint/Office 365 realm (with a little .NET 5 in there to maintain my Dev street cred):

My last-day sessions:

JEA: A PowerShell Toolkit to Secure a Post-Snowden World

When asked what to do about corporate hacking, Ex NSA Director Michael Hayden replied, “Man up and defend yourselves.” Edward Snowden then rocked the world by disclosing privileged NSA information. JitJea stands for “Just In Time, Just Enough Admin.” It’s a Windows PowerShell toolkit that admins use to perform functions without giving them admin privileges.

MVP Panel: SharePoint On-Premises, Online and Everything in Between
Imagine five great minds coming together to talk about Microsoft SharePoint across the board, be it within Microsoft Office 365, in Microsoft Azure, on-premises and certainly hybrid. Via a panel Q&A format, these MVP experts expose how online and hybrid improvements increase both deployment scenarios and value. This session is designed to help ITIs and ITDMs find the right cloud formula to deploy based on practical business and technical considerations. This is a must-not-miss session for any IT pro!

How to Decide When to Use SharePoint and Yammer and Office 365 Groups and Outlook and Skype
Your users may struggle with these questions: Should I share a message via Skype for Business instead of Yammer, Office 365 Groups, or Exchange? Should I collaborate on data using an Excel sheet or a SharePoint list? Should I share a file in Outlook, in a meeting, from OneDrive for Business, on Yammer, in a Group, or in a SharePoint site? This session is the ‘How To’ user’s guide What happens when your users can’t decide what technology or feature to use? They use what they know, or what’s easy; even if better options exist. In this session, Richard and Kanwal help you maximize the value of your Office 365 investment by providing the guidance you need to help your users make better, more effective decisions on how they get work done.

Experts Unplugged: Office 365 Security

OneNote for OneLife: From Notes to Productivity and Platform
OneNote is awesome. Really. Knowledge, learning and info on the bleeding edge benefits from structure – but not too much structure. We all need a place to inscribe understanding, without having to go overboard on the word-processing end of things.  I’m always thrilled to hang out with the OneNote crew as I sometimes wonder if they know they have the future of Education and Wikis in their hands.

Microsoft OneNote gives you one place for your notes and other content with you, anywhere now that OneNote is across all platforms and devices. Write by hand, type, record, snap a picture, clip from the web, or use a growing number of other partner apps and devices and OneNote saves it. Organized or not, you can easily find your notes in any form (text, writing, picture, or audio) with OneNote search. This session demonstrates end-user productivity scenarios at work to give you a clear understanding of how OneNote can help drive adoption of Office 365 with cross-platform, real-time collaboration, and extensibility with OneNote API. You’ll walk away wanting to use, evangelize, and build on OneNote personally or for your organization.

Microsoft Ignite Conference: Day 3 Round-Up

I’ll kick off Day 3’s post with another imprint of pure experience. Scale- On-premise, Cloud, Global, Local. The rush/distraction/tunnel vision of being one of 23,000+ people moving through the Microsoft Ignite conference, contrasted with simple but essential logistics like bio-breaks and food, are a big parallel for me to the distinct juncture we are at in technology:  empower everyone at a mass scale, but make sure the human details are taken care of, and that everyone has a voice.

The entrance hall may resemble a slightly above average shopping mall scene for most, but in context, on the ground, it was more like the entrance to a spaceship waiting to take off:
Entrance

Existential experiences aside, I waited a full 5 minutes for cell phone guy to abandon his hostile takeover of Microsoft (pleading eye contact included), and finally realized that was 5 minutes I would never get back, so I snapped my obligatory “largest Expo Hall ever” pic:
Microsoft
Really, words don’t help much with describing the scale of this event. 23,000 of the world’s finest Microsoft-oriented IT professionals in not one, but two Conference centers daisy-chained together. Being from Canada, the SCALE of business in America is always impressive-  this time it was the hammer of Thor (axe of Abe Lincoln?). There were numerous, well-attended core educational/interactive groups with all the best of the Microsoft team providing direct interaction with attendees. These were no tradeshow stunt doubles, but really the actual program leads and people who make things move at Microsoft. Super high quality interactions all over the floor.

Office 365

TechNet is my bible, which would make Joanne & KC here (Senior Content Writers for Microsoft), pretty high up in the toga-wearing department:
TechNet Rocks

Aside from the separate, colossal pool of core Microsoft and Partner & Vendor talent present in the Expo Hall, here’s the top sessions from day 3, on the SharePoint/Office 365 tip (with some guest appearances from OneNote & Visio, as I love both):

Whats New for IT Professionals in SharePoint Server 2016
What's New for IT Professionals in SharePoint Server 2016

“Engineering paths directly influenced by SP Uservoice” See: https://sharepoint.uservoice.com/forums/282887-customer-feedback-for-sharepoint-server
“Durable Links- permalinks based on resource ID. Move Docs freely, URL stays the same”
“No downtime CU patching”
“OneDrive integration big priority for Engineering team”

 

This article describes initial investments made in installation and deployment of SharePoint Server 2016: http://blogs.technet.com/b/wbaer/archive/2015/05/12/what-s-new-in-sharepoint-server-2016-installation-and-deployment.aspx

MinRole for the win!!
image10_00727E0C

Embrace the BYOD Revolution: Effectively Manage a Multi-Device, Multi-Generational Workforce


A major business transformation is brewing in the enterprise today. Mobile technologies, business velocity, geographically dispersed and multi-generational workforce are converging to deliver the promise of responsive organizations. Organizations that miss this paradigm shift will face dire consequences. How can you effectively manage this shift, ensure that it will be sustainable and reap the benefits of being a responsive organization? In this session, learn how to apply practical steps and effective techniques to manage your multi-device and multi-generational workforce.

MVP Panel: Sample Apps and Intelligent Solutions Showcasing Office Graph and Delve Extensibility

Preparing for a meeting, but not sure what documents are relevant? Writing a proposal and looking for similar documents to help you out? Interested in what your colleagues are working on to stay updated? With the new Office Graph, answers to those questions are within your reach. In this demo-packed session, we show you how the Office Graph works and how it can be used when building custom apps and enriching existing solutions and portals. All scenarios are backed up by real-life solutions that you could use in your organization.

Microsoft Ignite Conference: Day 2 Round-Up

Day 2 started off with a walk to the shuttle bus under the looming John Hancock building. Infrastructure into the Cloud, this pic worked out well as a deep ol’ metaphor 🙂 :
John Hancock

Here’s some of the most awesome SharePoint/Office 365 sessions from Day 2:

There are over 150 Day 2 sessions available for immediate viewing.

Source: Microsoft Ignite Day 2 Sessions On-Demand

Here’s my takeaways from the sessions I had scheduled:

Microsoft Office 365 Groups Overview and Roadmap

“It’s not an email, it’s a conversation.”
Dynamics CRM and Group’s integration.

Office 365 Groups helps you collaborate by easily bringing together your colleagues and the applications you need to get work done. Office 365 Groups leverages a standard definition for team membership and permissions across Microsoft Exchange, SharePoint, and later Skype for Business, Yammer and the rest of Office 365, managed through Microsoft Azure Active Directory. This session provides an overview of Office 365 Groups, demonstrates its capabilities today, and provides a roadmap for future investments.

Designing and Applying Information Architecture for Microsoft SharePoint and Office 365

Provide Clear Guidance
Make it Easy
Keep it Simple, Stupid
Define > Design > Implement > Govern

This session demonstrates a proven process for defining, designing, implementing, and governing your information architecture (IA). IA is more than just columns and metadata. Learn how the different components available in SharePoint and Microsoft Office 365 can be leveraged to their fullest potential and your users’ ultimate benefit to content organization and discovery.

Managing Change in an Office 365 Rapid Release World

Selective First Release! Roll out first release changes to selected users only. ’nuff said.

Before moving to Microsoft Office 365, your team planned each and every change or update before your users saw anything new or different. Now in a services-first world, changes are introduced at a rapid pace, sometimes before you or your help desk may be prepared. Office 365 provides communications to help you manage change, stay informed, and inform your users. Learn how to best use the Office 365 Message Center, Roadmap.office.com, and Success.office.com to get ahead of updates and help your business take advantage of the latest and greatest Office 365 has to offer.

Microsoft Office 365 Groups Deep Dive
Office 365 Groups helps you collaborate by easily bringing together your colleagues and the applications you need to get work done. Office 365 Groups leverages a standard definition for team membership and permissions across Microsoft Exchange, SharePoint, and later Skype for Business, Yammer, and the rest of Office 365, managed through Microsoft Azure Active Directory. This session follows the introduction session “Microsoft Office 365 Groups Overview and Roadmap,” and covers the following topics: architecture, administration, security and compliance, and extensibility.

All in all a great day- I was also lucky enough to be able to work at the Microsoft MVP Booth (in the “Microsoft on Microsoft” section of the Expo Hall). Very rewarding to answer questions about the MVP program and connect with people from around the world.

MS MVP Booth

MVPS

Using the built-in Windows Problem Steps Recorder to document user woes

I’m re-introducing the Windows PSR (Problems Steps Recorder) as one of those cool tools we come across, get distracted, forget about, and then come back to as “wow that’s hot”.

Problem Steps Recorder (PSR.exe), is shipping on all builds of Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows 8.1.1, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012 & Windows Server 2012 R2. Unfortunately, there is no equivalent Microsoft provided program available for Windows Vista, Windows XP, or other Microsoft operating systems prior to Windows 7. This feature enables the collection of the actions performed by a user while encountering a crash or running through the things they are trying to do, so that we as Consultants, Developers, Support Technicians & Admins can figure out what exactly is going south.

To begin creating their documentation, the user would press the Start Record button.

They would then begin going through the steps that took them towards their question or problem. At any point during this process, they can press the Add Comment button to highlight a problem area and add comments. Once they are done, they click the Stop Record button. Once they stop recording, a Save As window appears letting them browse to the location they want to save the documentation. A zip file is created and saved to that location. Inside the zip file is a .mht file containing the documentation. You will need to use Internet Explorer to view the MHT file.

Opening the documentation will present the help desk, admin, or family tech guy with a step-by-step walkthrough of what the user did, complete with screenshots and any comments made by the user.

Click here for a sample of what the recorded output looks like:
Windows-PSR-SharePoint-Problem-Steps-Recorder-Debugging

In addition to the screenshots, at the bottom of the report file the PSR generates you’ll find a copy & pastable (plain text) output of the events, like the following:

Recording Session: ‎2014-‎05-‎29 7:35:48 PM – 7:36:51 PM

Recorded Steps: 4, Missed Steps: 3, Other Errors: 0

Operating System: 9600.17041.amd64fre.winblue_gdr.140305-1710 6.3.0.0.2.48

Step 1: User left click in “Sites – Internet Explorer”
Program: Internet Explorer, 11.00.9600.16384 (winblue_rtm.130821-1623), Microsoft Corporation, IEXPLORE.EXE  SCODEF:13064 CREDAT:1782837 /PREFETCH:2, IEXPLORE.EXE
UI Elements:

Step 2: User mouse wheel down in “Pages – Engineering – Internet Explorer”
Program: Internet Explorer, 11.00.9600.16384 (winblue_rtm.130821-1623), Microsoft Corporation, IEXPLORE.EXE  SCODEF:13064 CREDAT:1782837 /PREFETCH:2, IEXPLORE.EXE
UI Elements:

Step 3: User left click in “Pages – Engineering – Internet Explorer”
Program: Internet Explorer, 11.00.9600.16384 (winblue_rtm.130821-1623), Microsoft Corporation, IEXPLORE.EXE  SCODEF:13064 CREDAT:1782837 /PREFETCH:2, IEXPLORE.EXE
UI Elements:

Step 4: User Comment: “This is where it breaks”
Program:
UI Elements:

How to Use the PSR

Notes

  • When you record steps on your computer, anything you type will not be recorded. If what you type is an important part of recreating the problem you’re trying to solve, use the comment feature described below to highlight where the problem is occurring.

    Some programs, like a full-screen game, might not be captured accurately or might not provide useful details to a support professional.

To record and save steps on your computer

  1. Open Problem Steps Recorder by clicking the Start button, and then typing psr. In the list of results, click psr.

  2. Click Start Record. On your computer, go through the steps on your computer to reproduce the problem. You can pause the recording at any time, and then resume it later.

  3. Click Stop Record.

  4. In the Save As dialog box, type a name for the file, and then click Save (the file is saved with the .zip file name extension).

    To view the record of the steps you recorded, open the .zip file you just saved, and then double-click the file. The document will open in your browser.

To send the problem steps in e‑mail

  • After recording and saving a .zip file, click the help down arrow , and then click Send to E‑mail recipient. This will open an e‑mail message in your default e‑mail program with the last recorded file attached to it.

    Note

    • You won’t be able to click the Send to e‑mail recipient option until you’ve recorded and saved a file.

To annotate problem steps

  1. Open Problem Steps Recorder by clicking the Start button , and then typing psr. In the list of results, click psr.

  2. Click Start Record.

  3. When you want to add a comment, click Add Comment.

  4. Use your mouse to highlight the part of the screen that you want to comment on, type your text in the Highlight Problem and Comment box, and then click OK.

  5. Click Stop Record.

  6. In the Save As dialog box, type a name for the file, and then click Save.

    To view the record of the steps you recorded, open the .zip file you just saved, and then double-click the file. The document will open in your browser.

To adjust settings

When you adjust settings for Problem Steps Recorder, they’re only saved for your current session. After you close and reopen Problem Steps Recorder, it will return to the regular settings.

  1. Open Problem Steps Recorder by clicking the Start button , and then typing psr. In the list of results, click psr.

  2. Click the help down arrow , and then click Settings.
  3. You can change the following settings for Problem Steps Recorder:

    • Output Location. If you don’t want to be prompted to save a file after recording, click the Browse button to set a default output file name.

    • Enable screen capture. If you don’t want to capture the screen shots along with the click information, select No. This might be a consideration if you are taking screen shots of a program that contains personal information, such as bank statements, and you are sharing the screen shots with someone else.

    • Number of recent screen captures to store. While the default is 25 screens, you can increase or decrease the number of screen shots. Problem Steps Recorder only records the default number of screen shots. For example, if you took 30 screen shots during a recording but only had 25 screen shots as the default, you would be missing the first five screen shots. In this case, you would want to increase the number of default screen shots.

What about the other screenshot tool <X>?

As usual in software-type things, there’s more than one product around that does the same type of thing. For screenshots, even just in the Microsoft stack there’s:
OneNote Screen Clipping – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r6yutoKDZLE
Office Screen Clipping – http://office.microsoft.com/en-ca/word-help/insert-a-screenshot-or-screen-clipping-HA010355185.aspx

On the general market, there’s:

I use the great SnagIt on a daily basis to make screenshots (just trying out version 12 this week myself) however, it’s more for us as Consultants to create content for consumption by others. The Problem Steps Recorder has the advantage over SnagIt for particular scenarios where you need the user to show you what’s going on:

– Free
– Built into most Windows environments you’ll encounter these days
– Can be run by end users with very little instruction
– Can be used on workstations where remote desktop’ing in isn’t available, performed autonomously by end users
– Handles all the screenshot’ing, layout, description of user interaction events
– Provides detailed descriptions of interaction events that would be otherwise time-consuming/difficult for a human to collect manually

Final Victory of the PSR

2014-05-29_20-24-13
The final advantage I see in the PSR in general (as a troubleshooting tool), is a huge one:
By empowering the user to document their own grief, with their own mouse button and on their own time, you are creating a purer user story:

– they are not being influenced by weird remote desktop software running on their workstation
– they don’t have to worry that the visiting technician invading their desktop is going to discover what kinds of oddball websites they visit while poking around
– there’s less time constraints as the user can run this on their own time, again without someone breathing down their neck
– there’s less chance of their user story being tainted as there’s no one coaching them, directly or indirectly

References:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/patricka/archive/2010/01/04/using-the-secret-windows-7-problem-step-recorder-to-create-step-by-step-screenshot-documents.aspx
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/problem-steps-recorder-overview.aspx
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-CA/windows7/How-do-I-use-Problem-Steps-Recorder
http://www.maximumpc.com/article/how-tos/how_use_windows_7_problem_steps_recorder_make_easy_pc_guides
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd371782%28v=vs.85%29.aspx
http://www.7tutorials.com/easy-troubleshooting-and-problem-solving-problem-steps-recorder
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6EgLm3-XcQ

SharePoint 2010 File Size Upload Limits – The Essential Mix

​Clearly there are a lot of articles & posts on net regarding increasing File Size Upload limits in SharePoint. Unfortunately I couldn’t find any one that was comprehensive enough to include ALL the tweaks you need to consider to accomplish the goal, on both the SharePoint and IIS level. So here’s mine:

Errors Encountered:
– “Page cannot be displayed” when uploading large files
– Error 0x800700DF: The file size exceeds the limit allowed and cannot be saved
– The specified file is larger than the maximum supported file size

1. Setting File Size Upload Limits on a Web Application

1. Login to Central Admin and navigate to Central Administration -> Application Management -> Manage Web Applications.
2. Once there highlight the web application that you want to change and then click on general settings:
clip_image001

3. Once in general settings scroll to the bottom of the list and you will see the maximum upload size the default setting is 50mb this can be can set to a maximum size of 2047mb (2GB). If you try to go beyond this it does flag up and tell you that you have exceeded the Maximum size.
clip_image002

2. Changing the Web.config file in the IIS Root Folder of Each Web Application

Independently of the SharePoint Web Application file size upload limit Central Admin steps described above, we need to also manually (backup with a copy first) open up the Web.config XML file located in the root folder of each web applications IIS Website.

1. Open the Internet Information Server (IIS) management console on the server desktop
2. Open the Websites tree node on the left 3. Select the website(s) one at a time and go to their root folder by clicking “Open in Explorer View”
3. Locate the web.config file in the folder and make a copy of it (generally acceptable to leave a copy with a name like “web_backup.config” in the root folder) in case it becomes corrupted while you’re editing it.
4. Open the web.config file with NotePad and change the value in the following node from the default of 50MB (expressed in KB):

<httpRuntime maxRequestLength=”51200″ />
..to a new value, e.g. 200 MB:
<httpRuntime maxRequestLength=”204800″ />

If you are not a math fan (like me), you can easily do the KB / MB / GB calculation (sorry, Bing doesn’t seem to want to help on this one!) by just typing in “200 MB in kilobytes” into Google.
5. IMPORTANT: Repeat the same settings configurations for each server in the SharePoint farm. Web.config’s are just plain XML files and when we are manually mucking about with them there is nothing to tell their sister .config files on the other SharePoint servers in the farm to reflect those changes. You want to avoid inconsistent settings between servers.

Notes on these steps:
– services will be briefly interrupted to SharePoint at the moment you click “Save” in Notepad as it will induce an application pool recycle
– make sure not to dilly dally when you have any particular web.config open in Notepad; it is possible that other processes could potentially may want to modify the config file while you’re using it. Get in and get out like that mission in Grenada.

3. Increase the IIS7 Machine-level Request Length Setting

1. Open an Administrative Command Prompt on each SharePoint server desktop
2. Enter the following command, entering the value in BYTES (not kilobytes this time) at the end:
%windir%system32inetsrvappcmd set config -section:requestFiltering -requestLimits.maxAllowedContentLength:209715200

You will receive a confirmation message after applying the command. Please bear in mind that you will need to run the cmd.exe in administrator mode.
clip_image004

Notes on these steps:
– services will be briefly interrupted to SharePoint at the moment you click “Save” in Notepad as it will induce an application pool recycle

4. Increase the IIS7 Application Pool Idle Time-out Settings (Optional)

IIS7 sets application pools to “time-out” after 20 minutes of inactivity. So if you don’t have a visitor to your site within 20 minutes the application pool will shut down – freeing up those system resources. Then the next time a request comes into the site IIS7 will automatically restart the application pool and serve up the requested pages.

This is a great way to preserve resources since every running application pool does place a certain amount of overhead on the system. But, it also means that the first request – the one that causes the application pool to restart – is very slow. It is slow because the process literally needs to start, then load the required assemblies (like .NET) then load the requested pages. Depending on the size and complexity of your application, this might just be a couple of seconds or it might take 30+ seconds (during which time a user would likely give up and move on to a different site).

If you want to extend the length of the time-out setting, just change it from the default of 20 to however many minutes you want. You can also adjust the setting to 0 (zero) which effectively disables the timeout so that the application pool will never shut down due to being idle.

1. Open Server Manager & Expand the Roles node
2. Expand the Web Server (IIS) node. Then click on the Web Server (IIS) node
3. Expand the node with your local server name
4. and click on the Application Pools icon. You’ll then see a list of the application pools that are defined on your server. In the right-hand pane you’ll see an option for Advanced Settings – click that.
clip_image005

5. Once you see the Advanced Settings dialog box just look for the Idle Time-out (minutes) property; click where the default “20″ is, and change it to whatever value you prefer.

Notes on these steps:
– you need to monitor & plan resource consumption; the idle timeout mechanism is there for the health of the overall system so that idle applications don’t chew up memory needlessly. Setting a huge timeout may be great for allowing big uploads but you need to make sure it’s not throwing resource consumption patterns off kilter in other areas.

5. Increase the IIS7 Connection Timeout Length (Optional)

One more thing to keep in mind is the connection timeout settings: When you upload large files, depending on your connection speed it can happen that the connection times out. If you want, you can increase the connection timeout to a larger value. The standard is 120 seconds. This step is optional, but can become required if you have users with low speed internet connections.

1. Open IIS
2. Select the Web Application
3. Click on Advanced Settings
4. Expand Connection Limits
5. Set the new value for Connection Time-out (seconds)

clip_image008

6. Increase the Web Client File Size Limit

When you upload a large file (over 50Mb usually) to SharePoint 2010, you might get an “Error 0x800700DF: The file size exceeds the limit allowed and cannot be saved” message. Check your  current SharePoint file size upload quota and web.config settings. If the quota is not a problem, then the error is most likely caused by a local restriction set on Web Client service. By default, Web Client file size limit is set to 47Mb or so. To increase this limit:

1. Open Windows Registry using regedit command
2. BACKUP THE REGISTRY!
3. Browse to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetServicesWebClientParameters
4. Right click on the FileSizeLimitInBytes and click Modify
5. Click on Decimal, and type 4294967295 and click OK
6. Restart Web Client service by typing services.msc.

This will increase the Web Client file size limit to 4Gb, which is a maximum file size you can upload using WebDAV. Please note, that this will only address Web Client service restrictions, and will not increase your SharePoint quota .. you still need to address those points approriately as per the linked MSDN blog post above.

It is also of note that the SharePoint max, cannot raise, hardcoded file size limit is 2GB, period, so raising to 4Gb is essentially overkill. 😉

p.s Don’t forget, if you want to use WebDAV effectively in SharePoint, you will need to have the Desktop Experience feature turned on in Win2k8 – you’ll run into inexplicable intermittent transfer drops otherwise.
That’s it!

clip_image010

7. Increase the SQL Chunk Size for Large Files

The large-file-chunk-size property sets the amount of data that can be read from server running SQL Server at one time. If you have a file that is greater than your chunk size (such as 70 MB when the chunk size is set to 5 MB), the file would be read in 14 chunks (70 / 5).
The chunk size is not related to the maximum upload file size. The chunk size simply specifies the amount of data that can be read from a file at one time. By default, the large-file-chunk-size property is set to 5 MB. If you notice performance or scale problems on the client or server, then you may need to tune this setting to get the performance you are targeting.

1.The large?file?chunk?size property must be set from the command line. This property is configured for a server or server farm, and cannot be configured for an individual virtual server. To set this property, use the following syntax:

Stsadm.exe ?o setproperty ?pn large?file?chunk?size ?pv <size in bytes>

2. After making a change to this property, you must restart IIS. You can restart IIS by typing iisreset on the command line.

Notes on this section
-if you raise the chunk size too high, the files might use up too much front-end memory and you may need to lower this setting.

Notes & Caveats

-2047MB is the limit you can use for uploading files. RBS does not get around this either. If you upload the 2GB file and watch you w3wp.exe worker process it will consume this extra memory so it’s not a good idea to do huge uploads it will stop other request to the server (IIS web site at least).
– the IIS7 worker process w3wp.exe has a 4GB limit therefore as the upload would need all the memory to perform an upload. 2GB is a safety limit enforced by SharePoint.